It seems like my 21 year old was just 5 years old yesterday. They say that time flies when you’re having fun. I say, time zooms by too fast.

We are pulled in many directions daily. It seems like there’s never enough time for anything.

But an understanding of what’s most valuable will determine how much time is spent where.

Five minutes? That seems short. But it is eternity for some people.

Read the story I read years ago and I hope it helps us all evaluate what is most valuable.

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While at the park one day, a woman sat down next to a man on a bench near a playground. “That’s my son over there,” she said, pointing to a little boy in a red sweater who was gliding down the slide. “He’s a fine looking boy,” the man said. “That’s my son on the swing in the blue sweater.”

Then, looking at his watch, he called to his son. “What do you say we go, Todd?” Todd pleaded, “Just five more minutes, Dad. Please? Just five more minutes.” The man nodded and Todd continued to swing to his heart’s content.
Minutes passed and the father stood and called again to his son. “Time to go now?” Again Todd pleaded, “Five more minutes, Dad. Just five more minutes.” The man smiled and said, “O.K.”

“My, you certainly are a patient father,” the woman responded. The man smiled and then said, “My older son Tommy was killed by a drunk driver last year while he was riding his bike near here. I never spent much time with Tommy and now I ‘d give anything for just five more minutes with him. I’ve vowed not to make the same mistake with Todd. He thinks he has five more minutes to swing. The truth is, I get Five more minutes to watch him play.”

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Kids grow up really fast… so it seems.
Action step? Drop the gadget and get some face to face conversation.

That five minute conversation may spell the difference between being a good parent from an amazing parents your kids can have.

Have a great weekend everyone!

Every summer, one of the things I look forward to is our annual Me and My Dad Camp.

While it’s only an overnight trip, it can be one of the best moments a father can have with his son/daughter and vice versa.

While it takes a lot of effort to set up the tent, cook your own food, travel to the camping place, what that does is that you build history together as father and son.

Looks more like a science experiment than dinner…

There are things that you cannot accomplish if you are at home, especially with the distractions of iPads and TV.

Building history together includes stories at night before going to bed, cooking your meal even if they’re burnt, sweating and jumping in the pool to cool off, getting a splinter and helping your son take it out… These and many more that will add to having history together.

I remember Steve Murrell (founding pastor of Victory) telling us a story of a very successful pastor who has a congregation of thousands. This particular pastor’s son approached his dad during one of the church activities designed for families and disclosed that he couldn’t remember a time that he had fun with his dad.

Now that’s a bomb no father would ever want to hear from his son.

Dads, build history with your children. Find the opportunity to build memories. Remember, it’s something that can never be taken from them. Cars will rust. Medals can get lost. Money can get stolen. But memories? That stays for a very very very long time.

No amount of success in the workplace can compensate for failure at home.

Reminder from my wife on day 2.

I’m no professional video editor, but I love putting videos together for my family whenever we go out for an overnighter or vacation.

I envision Jenn and I watching all these videos on our rocking chairs decades from now and remembering all the fun memories we were able to build with our kids.

Memories are powerful.  You can either have good ones or not so good ones growing up.  The worst?  Not having any to remember.

“Memory is a child walking along a seashore.  You never can tell what small pebble it will pick up and store away among its treasured things.”  ~Pierce Harris, Atlanta Journal