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(This was a message given by Pastor Steve Murrell at Every Nation World Conference 2016, Day 1.)

When Pastor Steve’s American friend met his future father in law who is Japanese, they had no clue how their cultures were so different.

When introduced, one will shake hands (American)  and the other will bow (Japanese). But his friend got a little too close to give a handshake. With a slight bow and being so close to his future father in law, they ended up bumping heads… a multi-ethnic headache.

In Luke 24, there was not a lot of ethnicity in the church. God had to open their minds to understand what Jesus mentions in verses 45-47.

Being called to go to every nation, we will be with people who look different, talk different and maybe even smell different. But the call remains – Go to all the nations!

This gospel is going to be preached to all nations.
The word for nations is the word “ethnos”.
The gospel is going to other ethnicities.

People talk about being color blind. But the problem with being color blind is that you don’t get to celebrate color.

“The church is like the eye. It has a little black in it and a little white in it. And without both, we cannot see.” – C.H. Mason

This gospel message has to go out to the nations and you are the messenger.
A witness is a messenger.
But you are not going alone. Jesus said that His Holy Spirit is going to come.

As a motorcyclist is foolish to go out without a helmet, so is a witness who goes out without the Holy Spirit. It will not only be foolish but also dangerous.

 

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(This was a message given by Pastor Oscar Muriu of Nairobi Chapel at Every Nation World Conference 2016, Day 1.)

Are the things you are living for worth Christ’s dying for?

For Christ’s love compels us. (2 Corinthians 5:14-20)

Selfishness has become an accepted feature in Christianity.
It’s become how God will help me and bless me. We have to remember that the purpose of my life doesn’t revolve around myself.
We act as if God belongs to us rather than us belonging to Him.
God is not interested in your plans for your life but for your involvement in His plans for your life.

Whatever is to my profit, I now consider loss. (Philippians 3:7-9)

There are no great advances made in Christianity by men who are unwilling to give up their lives. We have to remember, we no longer live for ourselves any longer.

We are Christ’s ambassadors, given the ministry of reconciliation.
Each day, about 155,000 people slip into Christless eternity
It will take a sacrifice to not live for self.

Here’s the choice that our Father wants us to understand as Christians – and I believe this is the choice of our age: “Do you want to be brave or safe? … because you cannot be both!” (Gary Haugen, International Justice Mission)

Brave means trusting God for your future.
Brave means to not know the details before obeying.
Brave means that God doesn’t have to ask for your permission.
Brave means that God doesn’t have to explain before you obey.

If your God has to ask you first then he is a small god.
Brave is not the absence of fear but the assurance of His peace.

Jesus proved His love on the cross.
He doesn’t have to prove His love for you again.

You and I are dead to ourselves when we gave our lives to Christ.
Dead men are no longer afraid. They don’t flinch.
Poke them and they will not react.
However, some of us have never died. We just fainted.
There’s still self-preservation left inside the coffin.

Challenging question: “Is what you’re living for worth Christ’s dying for?”

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(This was a message given by Pastor Brett Fuller of Every Nation Virginia at Every Nation World Conference 2016, Day 2.)

Do two walk together, unless they have agreed to meet? Amos 3:3

Walking together has many benefits. It may have challenges but the fruit we produce is so much better. We can do things much better than if we do them all by ourselves.img_3429

Walking together requires CONVICTION, CONSISTENCY and COMMITMENT.

1. CONVICTION

Conviction to walk together in the midst of diversity.
Acts 13 shows us picture of diversity. The leaders were Barnabas who was Jewish, Simeon who was also called Niger (word when translated is black), Menaen who was a friend of Herod, Lucius from Cyrene and Saul who was a Jew who loved Gentiles.

Walking together requires a conviction to walk with each other no matter the differences.

2. CONSISTENCY

Walking together also requires consistency.
There ought to be a rhythm.
We are with one another enough that we have lots of opportunities to offend each other. But that is not the issue. We are walking together in the rhythm of the same beat – to go and make disciples of all nations.

We walk together towards a specific direction.
Direction is necessary to get to where we need to go. Going the same direction means confining myself to a navigable route. One of the highlights being in an Every Nation Conference is being in the sessions. But equally amazing is walking through the lobby meeting with the people we can call family.

“We may not know each other – I don’t know you and you don’t know me but I like being with you because we’re going the same direction.”

3. COMMITMENT

And finally, walking together requires commitment.
We are with each other enough, we will give more than enough reason to stop walking with each other. We will say things that may offend. We will give each other dozens of opportunity to say goodbye. But we are here for the long haul. And it is a privilege to walk together for the long haul for the purposes of God.

This is miraculous.
But while it’s miraculous, it doesn’t happen by serendipitous moments.
It is because we make a commitment.
Coming to a conference like this maybe inconvenient and expensive but we wouldn’t have it any other way. We’re walking together for the long term purposes of God.

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